Old European Diamond Cut

The popularity of Old European cut diamonds is rising, especially for engagement rings. The old European diamond cut has been flaunted by stars such as Scarlett Johansson, Olivia Wilde, and Miley Cyrus. Old European cut diamonds are shining brightly in the spotlight.

The History of the Old European Cut:
The majority of Old European cut diamonds were used between 1890 and 1930. They feature 58 facets with a flat culet (instead of coming to a point at the bottom). They were cut by hand to perform well in candlelight.

More for your Money:
Old European Cut diamonds are less expensive than the modern round brilliant cuts. Vintage and antique jewelry is often priced 25-30% or more under the price of a new product.

On top of that, you are often getting a better diamond. Cut grades are based on the proportions of modern stones. So a fair cut grade may actually be full of light and sparkle, and often appears larger than a round brilliant cut of the same carat weight.

You may also see a better color than the grade given, as diamond colors are determined from the side while the diamond is lying upside down. Due to the difference in modern proportions once again, your face-up Old European cut may appear more colorless than its assigned grade.

Styles Featuring Old European Cuts:
You will find the Old European diamond cut primarily featured in Victorian, Edwardian, and Art Deco pieces. These timeless and beautiful styles are fantastic and unique choices for engagement rings and more! Victorian with its feminine and ornate characteristics most commonly in yellow gold. Edwardian style crafted in white metals in ethereal styles with garlands, ribbons, and bows featured throughout. Art Deco created largely in platinum with its clean lines, geometric patterns, and pave diamond accents.

Solvang Antiques has a plethora of jewelry featuring Old European cut diamonds. You are sure to find a style that fits the uniqueness and budget you are trying to achieve. We are always here to help if you have questions, with a GIA trained Graduate Gemologist on staff.

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